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Effects of initiating moderate wine intake on abdominal adipose tissue in adults with type 2 diabetes

A study from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel investigated the effect of wine consumption on weight gain and abdominal fat accumulation and distribution in patients with type 2 diabetes.

In the 2-year randomised controlled trial, patients who were alcohol-abstaining adults with wellcontrolled type 2 diabetes, following a Mediterranean diet were randomly assigned to drink 150 ml of mineral water, white wine or red wine with dinner for 2 years. Visceral adiposity and abdominal fat distribution were measured in a subgroup of sixtyfive participants, using abdominal MRI.

There were 48 participants who completed a second MRI measurement were included in the 2-year analysis. 27 consumed red wine, and 21 consumed mineral water. Throughout the 2 year period, no changes in antidiabetic medication and no substantial changes in energy intake were recorded. A similar level of weight loss (sd) was observed in both groups: (red wine 1·3 (3·9) kg and water 1·0 (4·2) kg. Changes (95 % CI) in abdominal adipose-tissue distribution were also similar: for red wine, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) -3·0%, deep subcutaneous adipose tissue (DSAT) +5·2 %, superficial subcutaneous adipose tissue (SSAT) -1·9%; and for water, VAT -3·2%, DSAT +2·9%, SSAT -0·15%. A 2-year decrease in glycated haemoglobin (β=0·28, P=0·05) was associated with a decrease in VAT.

The study suggests that moderate wine consumption, as part of a Mediterranean diet, in persons with controlled diabetes did not promote weight gain or abdominal adiposity.

Source: Effects of initiating moderate wine intake on abdominal adipose tissue in adults with type 2 diabetes: a 2-year randomized controlled trial.Golan R et al. Public Health Nutr. 2016 Oct 3:1-7.

 
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