Page last updated:April 20, 2015
Alcohol consumption and the risk for developing pancreatitis: a case-control study in Japan

A study investigated the association of alcohol consumption and pancreatitis in Japan. The nationwide case-control study included 982 patients (574 patients with acute pancreatitis and 408 patients with chronic pancreatitis) and 1015 controls who were individually matched for sex, age, hospital, and time of their first hospital visit. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of alcohol consumption and smoking with pancreatitis.

The patients had a mean age of 57.6 years; 71.8% were male. Compared with nondrinkers, alcohol consumption of less than 20 g/d was not associated with the risk for total pancreatitis (odds ratio [OR], 1.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-1.4).

In patients with acute pancreatitis, the ORs (95% CI) for alcohol consumption of 20 approximate to < 40 g/d, 40 to < 60 g/d, 60 to < 80 g/d, 80 to < 100 g/d, and 100 g/d or greater were 1.7, 3.1, 4.2, 5.3, and 6.4, respectively. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the ORs (95% CI) for alcohol consumption of 20 to < 40 g/d, 40 to < 60 g/d, 60 to < 80 g/d, 80 to < 100 g/d, and 100 g/d or greater were 2.6, 3.2, 9.2, 13.0, and 19.6, respectively.

The authors state that their study precisely measured the quantitative effect of alcohol on the risk for developing pancreatitis and found that compared with non drinkers, alcohol consumption of less than 20 g/d was not associated with the risk for total pancreatitis, whereas higher consumption was, with risk increasing as consumption levels rose.

Source: Alcohol consumption and the risk for developing pancreatitis: a case-control study in Japan. Kume K; Masamune A; Ariga H; Shimosegawa T; Pancreas Vol 44, No 1, 2015, pp53-58.

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