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Dietary factors and lung function in the general population: wine and resveratrol intake

According to authors of a study published in the European Respiratory Journal, ‘Wine intake is associated with a better lung function in the general population, yet the source of this effect is unknown’. Resveratrol, a polyphenol in wine, has anti-inflammatory properties in the lung, its effects being partially mediated via induction of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activity.
Study reseachers assessed the impact of wine and resveratrol intake and SIRT1 SNPs on lung function in the general population. Effects of red and white wine and resveratrol intake on FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC were analysed in the population-based Doetinchem cohort (n=3,224). Associations of four tagging SIRT1 SNPs with lung function were analysed in the Doetinchem (n=1,152) and Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen (n=1,390) cohorts.
Resveratrol intake was associated with higher FVC levels and white wine intake with higher FEV1 levels and lower risk of airway obstruction. SIRT1 SNPs were not significantly associated with level or course of lung function, neither directly nor indirectly via wine or resveratrol intake.
The authors state that this study shows a positive association of resveratrol intake with lung function in the general population, confirming the previously reported positive association of white wine intake with higher levels of FEV1, and additionally shows an association with a higher FEV1/FVC ratio. These effects do not likely run via SNPs in SIRT1.
Source: Dietary factors and lung function in the general population: wine and resveratrol intake. Siedlinski M; Boer JM; Smit HA; Postma DS; Boezen HM. European Respiratory JournalVol 39, No 2, 2012, pp385-391

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