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Relationship between alcohol consumption and components of the metabolic syndrome in adult population from Maracaibo City, Venezuela

Although the relationships between alcohol and disorders such as cancer and liver disease have been thoroughly researched, its effects on cardiometabolic health remain controversial. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the association between alcohol consumption, the Metabolic Syndrome (MS), and its components in a study conducted in Venezuela.

Descriptive, cross-sectional study with randomized, multistaged sampling, which included 2,230 subjects of both genders. Two previously determined population-specific alcohol consumption pattern classifications were utilized in each gender: daily intake quartiles and conglomerates yielded by cluster analysis. MS was defined according to the 2009 consensus criteria. Association was evaluated through various multiple logistic regression models.

In univariate analysis (daily intake quartiles), only hypertriacylglyceridemia was associated with alcohol consumption in both genders. In multivariate analysis, daily alcohol intake ≤3.8 g/day was associated with lower risk of hypertriacylglyceridemia in females (OR = 0.29, CI 95%: 0.09-0.86; p = 0.03). Among men, subjects consuming 28.41-47.33 g/day had significantly increased risk of MS, hyperglycemia, high blood pressure, hypertriacylglyceridemia, and elevated waist circumference.

The relationship between drinking, MS, and its components is complex and not directly proportional tne authors conclude. Categorisation by daily alcohol intake quartiles appears to be the most efficient method for quantitative assessment of alcohol consumption.

Source: Relationship between alcohol consumption and components of the metabolic syndrome in adult population from Maracaibo City, Venezuela. Bermúdez V, Martínez MS, Chávez-Castillo M, Olivar LC, Morillo J, Mejías JC, Rojas M, Salazar J, Rojas J, Añez R, Cabrera M. Adv Prev Med. 2015;2015:352547.

 

 

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