Page last updated:September 19, 2011
Red wine prevents the postprandial increase in plasma cholesterol oxidation products: a pilot study

Moderate wine consumption has been shown to lower cardiovascular risk. Results of a study published in The British Journal of Nutrition suggest that one of the mechanisms could involve the control of postprandial hyperlipaemia by reducing the absorption of lipid oxidised species from the meal.
The study investigated whether wine consumption with the meal is able to reduce the postprandial increase in plasma lipid hydroperoxides and cholesterol oxidation products, in human subjects. In two different study sessions, twelve healthy volunteers consumed the same test meal rich in oxidised and oxidisable lipids (a double cheeseburger), with 300 ml of water (control) or with 300 ml of red wine (wine). The postprandial plasma concentration of cholesterol oxidation products was measured by GC-MS. The control meal induced a significant increase in the plasma concentration of lipid hydroperoxides and of two cholesterol oxidation products, 7-beta-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol. The postprandial increase in lipid hydroperoxides and cholesterol oxidation products was fully prevented by wine when consumed with the meal.
In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that consumption of wine with the meal could prevent the postprandial increase in plasma cholesterol oxidation products.

Source: Red wine prevents the postprandial increase in plasma cholesterol oxidation products: a pilot study, Natella F; Macone A; Ramberti A; Forte M; Mattivi F; Matarese RM; Scaccini C. British Journal of Nutrition, Vol 105, No 12, 2011, pp1718-172.
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