Page last updated: Tuesday, November 03, 2009
Relation between modifiable lifestyle factors and lifetime risk of heart failure
A study by Luc Djousse, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, Boston and colleagues examined the association between modifiable lifestyle factors and the lifetime risk of heart failure in a large cohort of men.

During a mean follow-up of 22.4 years, 1200 men developed heart failure. Overall, the lifetime risk of heart failure was 13.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.9%-14.7%) at age 40 years. Lifetime risk remained constant in men who survived free of heart failure through age 70 years and reached 10.6% (95% CI, 9.4%-11.7%) at age 80 years. Lifetime risk of heart failure was higher in men with hypertension than in those without hypertension. Healthy lifestyle habits (normal body weight, not smoking, regular exercise, moderate alcohol intake, consumption of breakfast cereals, and consumption of fruits and vegetables) were individually and jointly associated with a lower lifetime risk of heart failure, with the highest risk in men adhering to none of the 6 lifestyle factors (21.2%; 95% CI, 16.8%-25.6%) and the lowest risk in men adhering to 4 or more desirable factors (10.1%; 95% CI, 7.9%-12.3%).

The study found that, in this cohort of apparently healthy men, adherence to healthy lifestyle factors, including moderate drinking, is associated with a lower lifetime risk of heart failure.

Source: Relation Between Modifiable Lifestyle Factors and Lifetime Risk of Heart Failure JAMA. 2009;302(4):394-400. Luc Djousse; Jane A. Driver; J. Michael Gaziano. Relation Between Modifiable Lifestyle Factors and Lifetime Risk of Heart Failure. JAMA, 2009;302(4):394-400

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